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Jobs for an Economics Major

Use Your Degree in One of These 14 Interesting Careers

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Being an economics major means you've taken (or will take) classes that explore finance, psychology, logic, and mathematics, among others. But just what kinds of jobs can you look for that will utilize everything you've learned and done as an economics major?

Fortunately, an economics major allows you to take a variety of interesting, engaging, and rewarding jobs.

14 Jobs for Economics Majors

1. Teach! You chose to pursue a career in economics because you love it -- and, most likely, because someone somewhere along the way helped spark that passion in both your heart and brain. Consider igniting that kind of interest in someone else by teaching.

2. Tutor. Economics may come easy to you, but many people struggle with it. You just might be able to make a career out of tutoring economics to high school students, college students, and anyone else who needs a little help.

3. Work at a college or university doing research. Think about it: You already have connections at your institution in the Economics department, and you're one of the freshest minds on the market. Consider doing academic research with a professor or department at your own or a nearby college or university.

4. Work at an institute doing research. If you like the idea of research but want to branch out a little from your college days, consider doing research at a think tank or other research institute.

5. Work for an economics magazine or journal. As an economics major, you no doubt came to understand how important journals are in the field. Working at a magazine or journal can be a really great gig that exposes you to a ton of new ideas and people.

6. Work for a large company in the business department. Put your economics training to good use by working on the business side of things for a large company.

7. Work at a nonprofit that helps people improve their economic situation in America. Fortunately, there are an abundance of nonprofits out there that help people do everything from save for a house, learn how to budget better, or get out of debt. Find one that matches your interests and see if they're hiring.

8. Work at a nonprofit that helps people internationally. Other nonprofits work to improve the economic conditions of people across the globe. If you want a larger impact, consider working for a nonprofit with an international mission you believe in.

9. Work at an investment or financial planning firm. Learning more about the markets in a hands-on kind of way can be an interesting, exciting job. Find an investment or financial planning firm that has an ethos you like and see what you can do!

10. Help a nonprofit with the business side of the house. Nonprofits do great work, from helping promote community gardens to bringing music into classrooms. They all, however, have to make sure their business affairs are in order -- and need people like you to help.

11. Work in the government. The government has many different offices and departments that deal with the business side of governance. See who's hiring and go to bed knowing you're helping your career and Uncle Sam.

12. Work for a political organization. Political organizations (including election campaigns) often need advice on handling economics issues, creating policy positions, etc. Put your training to use while also being involved in the political system.

13. Work for a consulting firm. Consulting firms can be a great gig for someone who knows they're interested in finance and business, but isn't sure yet about which sector they'd like to go into. Consulting will expose you to a lot of different companies and situations while providing you with a reliable -- and interesting -- job.

14. Work in journalism. Econ. major? In journalism? Explaining things like economic policy, the markets, corporate culture, and business trends is very difficult for many people -- except economics majors, who often have a better understanding of these kinds of issues than most folks out there. Consider using your understanding of all-things-economics-related to help others understand them better, too.

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